Bach and Baroque explores the French Baroque

Bach and Baroque explores the French Baroque

This fall, audience members for the Bach and Baroque Ensemble will have the opportunity to compare the world of J.S. Bach with that of the French Court when Professor Don Franklin leads the group on its first foray into music of the French baroque. The ensemble will perform Henry Du Mont’s Magnificat and and a trio sonata by Marin Marais. Du Mont was raised and educated in Maastricht, but it was in Paris where he truly made his mark, first as organist at the church of Saint Paul and eventually, composer at the court of Versailles. Du Mont’s Magnificat is from a collection of motets composed in 1686 for the court of Louis XIV. Marais was a student of Lully and famous for his operatic and instrumental compositions.

The German baroque will be well represented with J.S. Bach’s Cantata No. 131 and two works by Bach’s predecessor as cantor at Leipzig, Johannes Kuhnau: the cantata Gott sei mir gnädig (God be gracious to me) and motet Tristis est anima mea (My soul is sorrowful). Franz Tunder’s motet O Jesu dulcissime for bass and violins will feature soloist Sumner Thompson, a regular with the Bach and Baroque Ensemble and a rising star in the world of early music performance. He has been hailed as “the real thing” by The Cleveland Plain Dealer and praised for his “elegant style” by The Boston Globe.

Led by Pitt Professor of music Don Franklin, the critically acclaimed series brings together leading baroque performance specialists from Oberlin, Indiana University (Bloomington), Boston, New York, and Pittsburgh for readings that transform current research into musical practice. The concert takes place at Heinz Chapel on Sunday, November 12 at 3 p.m. General admission is $12, Student and senior admission is $8. Pitt students are admitted free with Pitt I.D.