Essays by Professor of music Don Franklin and Visiting assistant professor Jason Grant (PhD ’05)

Essays by Professor of music Don Franklin and Visiting assistant professor Jason Grant (PhD ’05) appear in the 2005 publication Passion, Affekt und Leidenschaft in der Frühen Neuzeit (Suffering, Emotion, and Passion in the Early Modern Period). Published by Harrasowitz Verlag (Wiesbaden, 2005), the volume includes a collection of papers presented at a conference held in 2003 at the Herzog August Bibliothek in Wolfenbütteler, Germany. The aim of the interdisciplinary conference was to examine the connections between suffering, emotion, and passion with special emphasis on the Passion Jesu Christi.

Grant’s paper, “The Rise of Lyricism and the Decline of BiblicalNarration in Georg Philipp Telemann’s Lukaspassion (1764),” explores the expansion of poetic passages in the Passion text, at the expense of Biblical narrative, and how this trend indicates a move away from Pietism toward Enlightenment ideals.

Franklin’s paper deals with “Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach’s 1789 Matthew Passion as Pasticcio and Parody,” a work Franklin presented as part of Pitt’s Bach and the Baroque series in 2002. Though C.P.E. Bach’s work is a parody, with music drawn primarily from J.S. Bach and Gottfried Homilius, Franklin shows how Emanuel’s re-ordering of recitatives and arias creates subtle shifts in theological perspective.